With over-population and climate change threatening almost all forms of life on Earth today, the list for needy causes is endless. Whether it’s hungry children in Mozambique, earthquake survivors in Indonesia or rhino conservation, there is no shortage of efforts that need help. Wildlife volunteering helps out conservations more than the eye can see. But how do you choose which one needs your time the most?

For many years charities and relief efforts have focused on humanity and its needs. Billions of dollars have been spent on hunger and health programmes for people in remote areas of Africa and Asia. Children and the elderly have been targeted as the main concern for hundreds of charity organisations. And still today the five biggest US charities focus on humanitarian needs. These philanthropic efforts are important, but what about the life that sustains us: nature? 

WHY WILDLIFE VOLUNTEERING IS SO IMPORTANT

Today a million species face extinction. If we don’t do something to stop this, there will be nothing left for future generations. Without healthy eco-systems and wildlife to keep nature in balance, human beings will no longer be able to support themselves.

Africa's rhinos extinction

Africa’s rhinos are on the brink of extinction because of widespread and excessive poaching. But at Rockwood, we’ve managed to protect over 300 southern white rhinos through our ‘aggressive conservation’ approach. We are committed to conserving the rhino species. But we can’t do it alone; we need your help.

Are you ready to travel to Africa? Do you want to be part of one of the most critical wildlife conservation projects in South Africa?


HERE’S WHY WILDLIFE VOLUNTOURISM IS A GOOD IDEA.

Travel with purpose and give back.

These days travelling is an expensive luxury. Not only that, but air travel contributes to a massive amount of air pollution. So why not give meaning to your air miles and offset your carbon footprint by giving back to Mother Earth. Volunteering for Rockwood rhino conservation will appease your hunger for travel and contribute to the environment while adding valuable purpose to your venturing.


Meet experts in the field. 

Are you passionate about wildlife conservation? At Rockwood, we work with scientists and conservation experts from around the world. Our volunteer programme is one of the few programmes which offers volunteers the opportunity to meet and work closely with top wildlife specialists. We rely on the assistance of volunteers to help collect and capture data, as well as other vital tasks that contribute to our programme. By inviting volunteers to visit and learn about rhinos, we also hope to share and spread our message about rhino conservation. At the same time, you gain invaluable experience and insight into the science of wildlife conservation.

wildlife conservation


Learn new skills.

Working in the field of conservation allows you to learn new skills which you may not learn anywhere else. Have you ever fed a baby rhino or collected health data? Do you know how to fix a fence or groom a horse? These may be skills that you will never need to use in the future, but they add to your life experience. We suspect that if you are reading this, you are looking for an experience that you may get anywhere else in the world. If you come to Rockwood, we can guarantee you will leave a different person, with a refreshed perceptive on life in Africa.


Improve your career chances.

Stepping out of your comfort zone and experiencing something new like volunteering, not only introduces you to new skills but also makes you more innovative and creative. Because of this, recruiters looking for potential employees are now ranking volunteer participation higher than a personal presentation, political affiliations and spelling and grammar. They understand that real-life experience shapes one’s character and helps develop insight and compassion that can’t be gained from a book. So, if you’re still unsure about what career to choose, start by volunteering at Rockwood. Discover your true potential. You never know what doors it’ll open for you in the future. 


Experience Africa.

Travelling to new parts of the world gives you insight and a greater understanding of other cultures. It helps you gain perspective on the needs and struggles that exist across the globe. Without experiencing life from the perspective of others, we cannot develop compassion. And without empathy, we cannot save species threatened with extinction, like the rhino. Come to Africa and experience life from an African perspective. Meet the men and women at Rockwood who are committed to saving Africa’s rhino species. 

Rockwood offers a legitimate and reputable volunteering programme to help with rhino conservation. We are committed to protecting Africa’s rhino species from going extinct. But we’re are running out of time. We need your help. 

Do you have a passion for nature and animals? Are you not afraid of getting dirty? Then you can contribute to the protection and preservation of Africa’s last remaining rhinos. 

SIGN UP TO VOLUNTEER AT ROCKWOOD TODAY.

Wildlife volunteering abroad at Rockwood, you will work closely with our experienced and professional rangers. Your daily tasks will vary depending on the needs of the day. Still, you can expect to be involved in a variety of activities during your stay with us. 


Your volunteer tasks will include:

  • Feeding rhinos and other animals
  • Monitor rhino health with rangers
  • Upkeep of rhino camps
  • Assist in data collection and capture
  • Assist vets in dehorning, micro-chipping and pregnancy tests
  • Provide care for orphaned rhino calves and any injured animals
  • Check and maintain camera traps
  • Clean and maintain horse stables
  • Feed and care for horses
  • Grooming and working with foals
  • Check and maintain fences and gates
  • Help kitchen staff prepare food
  • Maintain vegetable garden
  • Help out at a local school supported by Rockwood


Other volunteer activities include:

  • Learn to ride horses and join Rockwood’s rangers in monitoring rhinos on horseback
  • Take part in micro-chipping and collecting samples
  • Develop activities and lessons for local schools and community engagement
  • Photograph and write about events and experiences at Rockwood
  • Help capture data onto research database

RHINO POACHING

South Africa Boasts Decline In Rhino Poaching

South Africa’s recently released rhino poaching statistics confirm a drop in the country’s rhino poaching numbers. The numbers reveal a 26% decline from 769 rhinos poached in 2018, to 564 poached in 2019. As the fifth consecutive year to reflect a downward trend in poached rhinos, this is very good news for rhino conservation.

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Science To Save The White Rhino

In a significant breakthrough for rhino conservation, scientists have successfully created three northern white rhino embryos. With the last remaining male northern white rhino dying in 2018 and only two critically endangered females left in the world, this is a massive step for the subspecies’ survival. Can the white rhino be saved?

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VOLUNTEERING TO SAVE WHITE RHINO

Volunteer Your Gap Year To Save The White Rhino

Using your gap year to volunteer for a cause in need is a sure way to find out who you really are. As Mahatma Gandhi said: “The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.” So, where do you want to lose yourself? With 1 million species now critically endangered, our wildlife needs all the help it can get.

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Wildlife Voluntourism Is The Ideal Opportunity

With over-population and climate change threatening almost all forms of life on Earth today, the list for needy causes is endless. Wildlife volunteering helps out conservations more than the eye can see. But how do you choose which one of the many conservation efforts in South Africa needs your time the most?

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SAVE THE SOUTHERN WHITE RHINO

Become A Philanthropist At Rockwood

Nature is declining globally at previously unimagined rates. One million species are careering toward extinction. How can you help end one of Africa’s most urgent wildlife crises? It doesn’t mean you have to donate financially. One of the best ways to contribute to real change in the world is to volunteer your time.

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How Many Rhinos Are Left?

The three rhino subspecies in Asia, two of which, the Javan and Sumatran rhino, are listed as critically endangered. Estimates put their numbers at fewer than a hundred. The world’s last male northern white rhino died on 20 March 2018. His female and daughter are still alive, but no further breeding is now possible.

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